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What Is The Tabernacle For In A Roman Catholic Church?

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Richard Marsden Profile
Richard Marsden answered
The tabernacle is a box or a cabinet which sits at the centre behind the altar, or, increasingly, in another place to the side of the altar. It reserves the Blessed Sacrament; sacred vessels that hold consecrated hosts, which Catholics believe is the actual Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ. According to rules laid down by the Church, the tabernacle should not be see-through and should be made of a material that is unbreakable. Catholics kneel and pray towards the tabernacle because they believe they are actually praying in the physical presence of Jesus Christ on earth. They also genuflect (bending the left knee and placing the right knee cap on the ground) towards the tabernacle as a sign of respect and adoration. The contents of the tabernacle may only be touched by a priest or a Eucharistic minister. The tabernacle is opened during most Masses in order to obtain extra consecrated hosts if required for the distribution of Holy Communion. The hosts are also used for the distribution of Holy Communion outside the celebration of Mass. A large host may be reserved for the purposes of Eucharstic adoration, when the Blessed Sacrament is exposed on the altar for personal prayer and adoration of Jesus Christ.
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
A box that holds consecrated hosts, which will be served at mass during eucharist when entering and leaving mass, Catholics genuflect (kneel towards the tabernacle and make the sign of the cross).
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
It is where the host is stored and there is normally a red light next to it and on fridays the red light is of because friday is the day that jesus died.

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